Susan B. Anthony

On this date in 1820, Susan Brownell Anthony was born in Massachusetts. She taught school from ages 15 to 30 before devoting her life to reform. She and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, starting in 1850, became lifelong feminist collaborators. The tireless crusader spent 30 years campaigning for women's suffrage. Raised Quaker, she became a Unitarian but at the end of her life was an agnostic. Anthony's professed "creed" was that of "the perfect equality of women," according to Stanton.

While privately scolding Stanton for editing the controversial Woman's Bible, Anthony publicly defended her: "I think women have just as much a right to interpret and twist the Bible to their own advantage as men always have interpreted and twisted it to theirs." (Interview in the Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, quoted in The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony.) She also confessed, "But while I do not consider it my duty to tear to tatters the lingering skeletons of the old superstitions and bigotries, yet I rejoice to see them crumbling on every side."

Her biographer Ida Husted Harper wrote that after Anthony visited a poor mother of six in Ireland in 1883, Anthony noted that "the evidences were that 'God' was about to add a No. 7 to her flock" and later commented, "What a dreadful creature their God must be to keep sending hungry mouths while he withholds the bread to fill them!"

There is no record she ever had a serious romance despite receiving marriage offers and would answer journalists' questions with statements like "It always happened that the men I wanted were those I could not get, and those who wanted me I wouldn't have." To another she answered, "I never found the man who was necessary to my happiness. I was very well as I was." She had no desire to "give up my life of freedom to become a man's housekeeper."

She died of heart failure at age 86 in 1906 at her home in Rochester, N.Y.

"I could not dash her faith with my doubts, nor could I pretend a faith I had not; so I was silent in the dread presence of death."

—Anthony contemplating her sister on her deathbed, "The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony, Vol. 2" by Ida Husted Harper (1898)

Compiled by Annie Laurie Gaylor

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