Freethought of the Day

Would you like to start your day on a freethought note? Freethought of the Day is a daily freethought calendar brought to you courtesy of the Freedom From Religion Foundation, highlighting birthdates, quotes, and other historic tidbits.

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There are 3 entries for this date: Carl Brandes , Bill Haywood and Eugene M. MacDonald

Carl Brandes

On this date in 1847, Carl Brandes was born. The Danish writer and politician received a Ph.D. from Copenhagen University, and edited several radical political publications. His novels and plays propounded rationalist and progressive ideals. Brandes notably refused, as a freethinker, to take the oath when elected to the Folketing in 1880. Despite attempts to unseat him, he won the right to affirm. Even with his openly atheist views, he was appointed to the the post of Minister of Finance.

Compiled by Annie Laurie Gaylor

© Freedom From Religion Foundation. All rights reserved.

Bill Haywood

Bill Haywood

On this date in 1869, William Dudley "Big Bill" Haywood was born in Salt Lake City, Utah Territory. In 1896, when working in an Idaho silver mine, Haywood joined the Western Federation of Miners and became active in the union. By 1900, he was already a member of the union’s General Executive Board. Haywood was an advocate for industrial unionism, uniting all workers in "one big union," and was a founding member of the Industrial Workers of the World (Wobblies) in 1905. Haywood advocated direct action and strikes and was involved in many strikes, where he used innovative tactics in order to attract the attention of the press. Haywood had been involved with the Socialist Party of America but he and many IWW members wanted to focus on direct action and radical revolution instead of electoral politics and split from the Socialists in 1913. Haywood was also an advocate for racial unity in the labor movement, bringing black and white workers in segregated states like Louisiana into IWW-affiliated unions.

In 1917, Haywood and 164 other IWW members of the IWW were charged under the Espionage Act of 1917 for "conspiring to hinder the draft, encourage desertion, and intimidate others in connection with labor disputes." Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis presided over the five-month trial. Haywood was convicted and sentenced to 20 years in prison but skipped bail and fled to the newly formed Soviet Union. Haywood served as a labor adviser to Lenin's government until 1923, when Stalin rose to power. He did not speak Russian, and his Russian wife did not speak English. He died in 1928 from complications of alcoholism, diabetes and a stroke. After his cremation, his ashes were split between the Kremlin Wall Necropolis in Moscow and Chicago, where they were buried near the Haymarket Square Martyr’s Monument.

“To me [Christianity] was all nonsense, based on that profane compilation of fables called the Bible.”

—"Bill Haywood's Book: The Autobiography of Big Bill Haywood" (1929)

Compiled by Eleanor Wroblewski

© Freedom From Religion Foundation. All rights reserved.

Eugene M. MacDonald

Eugene M. MacDonald

On this date in 1855, Eugene M. MacDonald was born. The American journalist became a foreman at The Truth Seeker, a 19th-century freethought newspaper. When Truth Seeker founder D.M. Bennett died, MacDonald and two others established The Truth Seeker Company, buying the newspaper in 1883. MacDonald edited the 19th century's leading freethought publication for 26 years. His brother, George MacDonald, took over editorship when Eugene retired shortly before his death. Truth Seeker readers and contributors included Clarence Darrow, who wrote in 1931 that he had been connected with Truth Seeker for 50 years. D. 1909.

Sample of The Truth Seeker coverage, 1892

“The Chicago World's Fair having been decreed, the kind of church people who adopt meddling as a means of grace saw that now was their day of salvation. Hitherto, with their fussy restrictions on Sunday work and amusements, they had been obliged to function merely as local nuisances. Now they would close the World's Fair on Sunday and make themselves felt as pests by all nations. ... The meddlers resolved to memorialize Congress to pay no money, make no appropriations in behalf of the Fair, save on the promise that the key should be turned on the exhibits every Saturday night, with no relief until Monday morning. They circulated petitions to this effect, and did such a business in collecting names that in some places they claimed more signatures than there were people.”

—George MacDonald, "Fifty Years of Freethought, Vol. II" (1929)

Compiled by Annie Laurie Gaylor

© Freedom From Religion Foundation. All rights reserved.

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